mario

April 14, 2015 - single portrait

this teenage boy i met among other kids hanging out at the train station before we all had been dismissed … (please read the full background story here)

i talked to him for a while – i forgot asking for his name, i was distracted by what the cap said. he was very shy, kind and polite. i asked him where he was from because the sound of his dialect was quite familiar to me. he told me that he had just arrived from his home town far away in east germany. i promised to send him his pictures and he said he probably cannot get online the next few weeks while being away from home and a proper place to receive emails … or even to sleep savely. he was excited by the idea, though, that an email with this picture might be waiting for him when he returned home or found another place to check back on his former life remains. i unfortunately never learnt if he got it or not: the email and the new life.

he wanted to show me a certain face, a certain look, a certain state of mind, a certain attitude to the catastrophe of being young and alive. might be it was intentional, a theatralic gesture of a dramatized reality, a jim caroll kind of face (with the knowing of a glorious future) or  only half of what was really going on. i couldn’t judge that. his eyes mirrored so much sadness and dissapointment, so many questions and definite sentences at the same time that i hardly could stand looking into his eyes even through a lens. so i started joking with him and innocently flirting to make him laugh; i am good in that. it needed some effort but eventually he couldn’t resist and suddenly showed me a wonderful child like smile full of innocence. i almost hadn’t expect that he still has it and perplexed by its power and persuasiveness i missed to take another photograph.

here i decided to show him as he showed me himself in the first place, though. might be there his face was sending a certain message – besides of MARIO – and here it is.

About Trillian Petrova

scholar in humanities loves photography, people and travelling. the combination of all three together with a special skill in literature and writing make this 100strangers project rolling. i collect analog cameras and know how to use them.

› tags: 100strangers / canon 5d / digital / germany / munich / photography / portrait /

Comments

  1. Robbie says:

    Great shot and story.I think its awesome that you got him out of his shell a little bit and relaxed a little. Don’t think I’d be able to do that, ha ha.

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